FAQs

Floating offshore wind is the next frontier in renewable energy, generating clean, carbon-free electricity from one of our most abundant natural resources.

Some of the frequently asked questions about our project, and floating offshore wind more generally, are below. If you have any other questions, please contact us

  • Who are Falck Renewables and BlueFloat Energy?

    Falck Renewables, active in the UK since 2002, is a global player in clean energy, participating in solar, onshore and offshore wind. It already operates 12 UK onshore wind farms (413 MW) and has pioneered community ownership of wind energy by enabling thousands of people to buy stakes in their local wind farms.

    BlueFloat Energy is a global offshore wind developer with projects currently spanning Spain, Italy, France, Australia, and New Zealand, in addition to the UK, where it has recently secured three sites in the latest ScotWind lease round.

    Founded by renewable energy professionals and with a vision to accelerate global deployment of offshore wind as a key enabler for the energy transition and economic growth, BlueFloat Energy brings together remarkable team expertise in the design, development, financing, construction, and execution of offshore wind projects.

  • What is floating offshore wind?

    Floating offshore wind is the next frontier in renewable energy, generating clean, carbon-free electricity from one of our most abundant natural resources.

    Floating offshore wind turbines are mounted to floating structures which are anchored to the seabed using mooring systems. These floating structures, or ‘floaters’, are similar to floating platforms that have been used for decades in the oil and gas industry. As such, they are designed to keep the structure stable while at sea.

    Floating turbines are connected to the seabed with anchors and mooring lines instead of solid structures, enabling floating wind farms to be installed in much deeper waters and further out to sea. This has several benefits, from taking advantage of stronger and more consistent winds, to reduced visual and environmental impacts. Floating offshore wind technologies also unlock major economic benefits and supply chain opportunities for the local area.

  • Why do we need floating offshore wind?

    The development of floating offshore wind is essential to decarbonising the UK’s energy supply and tackling climate change, the greatest global challenge of our time.

    The UK Government has set several important targets to help steer the transition to a clean, zero-carbon future, with the overall goal of reaching Net Zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.

    Offshore wind has played a major part in the decarbonisation of the UK’s energy supply so far. Floating offshore wind can play an even bigger role, by taking advantage of stronger and more consistent winds. The UK has targets to develop 1GW of floating offshore wind by 2030, and 4GW by 2035.

    Llywelyn wind farm is one of two 300MW floating offshore wind projects in the Celtic Sea that will deliver clean, zero-carbon energy to South Wales and South West England. Together with our other project, Petroc, our Celtic Sea floating wind farms will make a significant contribution to meeting the UK’s target for 1GW of floating offshore wind by 2030.

  • How is floating offshore wind different to fixed-bottom offshore wind?

    There are several different designs of floating offshore wind technology, but most designs place a wind turbine on top of a ‘floater’, which is a partially-submerged structure that gives the turbine buoyancy and stability to allow it to float upright while at sea. This floating structure is then secured to the seabed using mooring lines, which are firmly anchored to the seabed, to stop it from drifting out of position.

    You can read more about the differences between floating and bottom-fixed designs here.

  • What are the benefits of floating offshore wind?

    There is a wide range of benefits of floating offshore wind, compared to bottom-fixed designs. Many of these advantages stem from being able to install floating turbines in much deeper water, much further offshore. This allows floating turbines to take advantage of stronger and more consistent winds, while reducing impacts on the view from the shore, marine ecosystems, or other marine uses such as fishing, shipping or tourism.

    You can read more about floating offshore wind and its advantages here.

  • Why did you choose this site?

    The Crown Estate has chosen the Celtic Sea (defined as the waters in the region around the South Wales coast and the South West peninsula) as the focus for its floating wind leasing process after mapping out the feasible areas for offshore wind in the region.

    The Celtic Sea offers a unique opportunity to unlock new clean energy capacity and help establish a new industrial sector. To date, these waters have seen comparatively little offshore infrastructure deployment.

    Llywelyn is one of two floating offshore wind projects being developed by Falck Renewables and BlueFloat Energy in the Celtic Sea (the other being Petroc, located in English waters). Both sites have been selected following an extensive assessment process which included the review of protected areas, environmental impact, cable routing, existing infrastructure, marine traffic, and fishing activity.

  • How far is the site from land?

    Llywelyn wind farm is located 40 miles from land, meaning it will have a minimal visual impact on the view from the shore, and minimal environmental impacts.

  • How will you connect this project to the National Grid?

    We intend to connect Llywelyn wind farm to the electricity grid at the 400kv substation in Pembrokeshire. We are in early stages of planning the exact cable route, but this will be published and consulted on in due course.

  • Where is the site?

    Llywelyn wind farm will be located in Welsh waters in the Celtic Sea, off the coast of Pembrokeshire. The wind farm will be located at least 40 miles from the shore at its closest point.

    You can see a map showing the proposed location of Llywelyn on the Home page.

  • How big is the site?

    Llywelyn wind farm will have an installed capacity of up to 300MW. The precise area of the wind farm will depend on the turbine technology that is selected, and the number of turbines, which will be confirmed later in the development process.

  • How many turbines will the site contain?

    Llywelyn wind farm will have an installed capacity of up to 300MW, using approximately 20 turbines.  The precise number of turbines will depend on the turbine technology that is selected, which will be confirmed later in the development process.

  • What technology are you using?

    We are examining several technologies for turbines and floaters. Our choice of technologies will be confirmed later in the development process, as floating offshore wind technology is advancing all the time. It will be based on a range of factors, including the maturity of the technologies, local content opportunities and requirements, availability and suitability of the port and shipbuilding infrastructure and the capabilities of the regional supply chain.

  • Will I be able to see the project from the shore?

    Llywelyn wind farm will be located at least 40 miles (64km) from the shore. This means the visual impact of the project will be very limited. A full visual impact assessment will be conducted later in the development process, and the findings will be published in the course of our consultation with local communities and stakeholders, prior to the submission of our application to Planning and Environment Decisions Wales (PEDW).

  • What will be the impact on the environment, birds and marine life?

    Llywelyn’s location has been selected following an extensive assessment process which included the review of protected areas and environmental impact. We will examine and mitigate all the potential environmental impacts, including on birds, fish and marine mammals, and seabed ecosystems. Mitigation of any environmental impacts will be possible through careful design of the development, and through the construction techniques.

    We have been undertaking monthly bird and mammal surveys at the Llywelyn site since March 2021, and further surveys are planned to continue in order to cover two breeding seasons. The studies have been carried out in cooperation with Natural Resources Wales and the Joint Nature Conservation Committee.

    The findings of these studies, and any mitigation or compensation measures necessary, will be published in the course of our consultation with local communities and stakeholders, prior to the submission of our application to Planning and Environment Decisions Wales (PEDW).

  • How will this project benefit the local economy?

    Unlike bottom-fixed constructions (which are assembled at sea), floating turbines need to be completely assembled onshore (at quayside), before being towed to sea to be installed. This means major economic opportunities for the local economies around ports and local supply chain that need to service the construction and maintenance of floating wind farms.

    We are actively engaged with the supply chain in South Wales and are planning on developing a local manufacturing base for floating offshore wind. Based on our extensive knowledge of the sector, we will select technologies that can maximise existing regional infrastructure while optimising new investments.

    You can find out more about local supply chain opportunities on our Supply Chain page.

  • Why is it named Llywelyn?

    With Llywelyn, and our other Celtic Sea floating wind project, Petroc, we wanted to celebrate the ancient Celtic heritage of the areas around our projects.

    The name Llywelyn is shared by several important figures from ancient Welsh history, including the first and only Welsh king to rule the entire territory of Wales.

  • When will the project be approved?

    Before we submit our application to Planning and Environment Decisions Wales (PEDW), we will undertake a process of considered engagement and consultation with local residents, businesses and community organisations across a wide area around Llywelyn wind farm. This process will ensure our proposal is fully scoped and refined prior to submission.

    We will publish more detailed timelines for consultation and engagement in due course, which you will be able to find on this website

    Once we submit our application, there are strict deadlines for the process leading to a decision of whether to grant or refuse consent. You can read more about this process on our Planning and Consultation page.

  • When will you begin construction?

    It is our ambition for Llywelyn Wind Farm to become operational by 2030, to make a significant contribution to the UK Government’s target for 1GW of floating offshore wind capacity by 2030. A high-level timeline for all stages of the project will be published in due course.

  • How are you engaging with the local community?

    Falck Renewables and BlueFloat Energy are committed to undertaking considered engagement and consultation with local residents, businesses and community organisations across a wide area around Llywelyn wind farm. You can learn more about our consultation on this website as the project develops.

    We will publish more detail about our plans for consultation and engagement in due course, which you will be able to find on this website. You can read more about the wider planning and consultation process on our Planning and Consultation page.